By my brother, Muhammad Tim, 4th year student at Madinah University:

Assalaamu alaykum warahmatullahi wa barakaatuhu,

All praise is due to Allah, and may peace and blessings be upon the Messenger of Allah, and upon his family and his companions.

With regard to the matter of sincere intention, it seems that some people are confused with regard to certain aspects. Therefore, I wished to make the following points, and all success is from Allah:-

1. Firstly, the correct intention is one of two conditions for every act of worship to be accepted, along with the action being in accordance to the Sunnah of the Messenger of Allah – may the peace and blessings of Allah be upon him. The proof for this is the statement of Allah, the Exalted, The proof for this principle can be found in Allah’s statement: “So whoever hopes for the meeting with his Lord – let him do righteous work and not associate anyone in the worship of his Lord.” [Al-Kahf 18:110].

2. Secondly, the essence of the correct intention is for an action to be sincerely for the sake of Allah, and not to contain any form of shirk, or giving some of Allah’s rights to someone or something else. Fadl bin Ziyaad said, “I asked Abu Abdullah (i.e., Imaam Ahmad) about the intention in action, how should it be? He said, ‘One should treat his self when he intends to do an action, not desiring by it the people (i.e. showing off).’”

3. Thirdly, intention is something that needs to be constantly reviewed and worked upon. Sufyaan ath-Thawree said, “I have not battled with anything more difficult than my intention.”

4. Fourthly, the fact that another person is the cause for some of your good deeds, or that they call you to guidance, or that they encourage you to do something which you were not intending to do, does not affect your intention. This is part of the foundation of da’wah and calling people to guidance. The Prophet – may the peace and blessings of Allah be upon him – used to encourage some of the companions to do actions that they were not intending to do, and he encouraged others to do the same. The Prophet – may the peace and blessings of Allah be upon him – said, “Whoever calls to guidance has the reward of it and the reward of everyone who acts upon it, until the Day of Resurrection, without their reward being decreased in any way.” So if a brother comes to you and says, ‘come to the masjid’, and you were not intending to come, but because of him calling you to guidance, you decide to come, and you make your worship for the sake of Allah alone, then your intention is correct, if Allah wills, and the fact that another brother called you to do something that you had not planned to do does not affect your intention.

Similarly, if your intention was not pure, and then you realise that you have been showing off in some of your deeds, then you correct them and seek Allah’s forgiveness, then your intention returns to being correct, and if you do so before you complete the action (such as before you finish praying), then you do not lose the reward of the entire prayer.

5. Fifthly, showing off is a form of minor shirk and is extremely serious, but it is equally serious to not perform good deeds out of fear of showing off. Al Fudayl bin ‘Iyaad considered it another form of riyaa’. Rather you should say, ‘O Allah, I seek refuge with you from making partners with you while I realise, and I ask your forgiveness for what I do not realise.’ Leaving that which Allah has ordered you out of fear of what people may say can even reach the level of major shirk, so do not allow the shaytaan to open a door to your destruction!

To answer the question, “if a person became Muslim because of worldly reasons but later changed their intention sincerely for the sake of Allah and repented, then that is okay?”

To answer this question, my point was that it may happen, and that a person may correct themselves. A person’s Islam is not accepted by Allah until it is sincere – this is one of the conditions of laa ilaaha ill Allah, but as Muslims we are commanded to treat them as normal Muslims, since the matter of intention is left to Allah. In general, we shouldn’t rush to encourage a person who is not sincere. This does not benefit Islam and the Muslims, and the person themselves may be harmed.

However, we may see someone who has some fault in their intention, and we believe that there is a good chance that the person will be corrected, based on their environment and their character. First of all we should try to correct their intention before they become Muslim. In the example of marriage, we try to make the marriage secondary to pleasing Allah. If we believe that they will change, then we may accept their Islam. However, if the person who they are marrying is not even practising Islam, then it is unlikely that they will see the beauty of Islam, when the person they are marrying does not even see it. So, I think that we should be very careful in some of these cases. More information here: http://islamqa.com/en/ref/26758

6. Sixthly, a person may enter Islam for the sake of the dunyaa, or with a fault in their intention and then correct his or her intention, as Imaan enters their hearts, and so become from the true Muslims. This was the case of some of the companions, especially those who became Muslim after the conquest of Makkah. Some of them became Muslim for worldly reasons, but the sun did not set before Allah and His Messenger were more beloved to them than the earth and whatever was in it. This does not mean that we should encourage people to become Muslim who do not want to, however, we have not been asked to rule based on the hearts of the people, and it is possible for people to change once they see the beauty of Islam.

7. Finally, do not succumb to the whispers of shaytaan, that when a person calls you to do something good you say, ‘my intention is not right’ – this is nothing but the whisperings of the shayaateen, may Allah protect me and you from them. Rather embrace this good deed and make it sincere for Allah without showing off. This way you will get the reward for your action, as will the person who called you to do good. At the very least be honest and say, ‘I am too lazy to do it’, rather than inventing a religious excuse that Allah has given you no authority for; perhaps Allah will open your heart to the truth because of your honesty.

Don’t forget that intention alone is not enough for your deeds to be accepted. They must also be in accordance with the Sunnah of the Messenger of Allah – may the peace and blessings of Allah be upon him. ‘Aa’ishah – may Allah be pleased with her – narrated that the Prophet – may the peace and blessings of Allah be upon him – said, “Whoever does an action that is not in accordance with my affair [i.e., my sunnah] then it is rejected.”

May Allah grant us all beneficial knowledge and the ability to act upon it, and save us from the whisperings of the shaytaan,

Wassalaamu alaykum warahmatullahi wa barakaatuhu,
Muhammad Humble.

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Many of us, though we may have sincere and righteous intentions, have recently misplaced our ahklaq (i.e. we have lost our manners).  This message is not directed towards one specific incident, but rather I’ve noticed a culmination of different events where many of our brothers (and sisters!), inlcuding myself perhaps have forgotten the proper way to advise our fellow muslims (an act known as irshad or islah).  When we advise our brothers and sisters if they are doing something incorrectly, we must remember to do it for the sake of Allah (SWT) with the best of intentions.  The believer looks for excuses, not blame for his brother.  We want the best for our brothers and sisters and hence we advise them because we love them, not because we think we are better than them.  For if think we are better than them, then this is arrogance and pride and arrogance and pride was the sin that got the rejected and accursed devil kicked out of paradise and doomed for eternity.  We should not think we are better than others.  We need to humble ourselves and be thankful that we are in a position to advise others.  We shouldn’t advise people harshly, rather we need to be gentle, yet firm.  The Messenger of Allah was the best of examples sent to mankind and he would be gentle with others.  We have heard the hadith of the man who urinated in the masjid and the Prophet (SAW) handled the situation in the most eloquent of ways.  Nowadays, if a brother is praying without a kufi (head-covering) or his pants below his ankles in the masjid, we may berate him, but is this really the best way, will he continue coming to this masjid?  There may be a time for harshness, but many of us are not in the situation to handle it as we are the laymen.

With that being said, we need give advice in private.  None of us likes being called out in public and hence we should treat others the way we would want to be treated.  With that being said, when we receive advice, regardless of who it is from, we need to be thankful and considerate of it.  It takes courage to give advice and when one receives it, we should pray for that brother or sister that advised us becaus they love us, regardless of whether they are correct or not.

We need to be on our best behaviour at all times for our akhlaq may be what draws people to our beautiful and truthful religion and way of life.  Nowadays, the brothers with the big beards or the sisters with niqaab are the ones that seem to be the most intimidating, but this is incorrect.  We should set good examples.  Who said to be religious means to be stern and harsh?  Often times, harshness by our brothers and sisters may scare off those people that are young and new to the religion.  Wasn’t there one point in our lives not long ago where we may not have turned out the way we have if it wasn’t for someone who was gentle and kind to us in their teachings?

The salaf (our pious predecessors) used to study ahklaq (good manners) twice as long as they studied knowledge.  How much time have we personally devoted to purifying our souls and being steadfast in our manners and characteristics.  The Prophet (SAW) said, “I guarantee a house in the highest part of Jannah for one who has good manners” (Abu Dawud) so why not aim for the highest part of paradise.  We need to be gentle, honest, and sincere in our character and manners.

I just felt the need to write this short piece up as a reminder to myself first and foremost and then to all of you for we know the reminder benefits the believer.  May Allah (SWT) allow us all to have the best of manners, to attain the highest part of Jannah, and to love one another for the sake of Allah (SWT).  Ameen.

By Imam Suhaib Webb

Imam al-Nawawi related the following:

“Purify your hearts [for the knowledge] the way land is purified for cultivation.”

Imam al-Shaf’i on Humility:

None of you will seek this knowledge with a domineering attitude and exaggerated self worth, then succeed. However, one who seeks this knowledge, struggles with his/her soul, [enduring] strained provision and [struggles in the] service to the scholars is successful.

 

I remember my Sheikh telling me: “My mother used to send me with gifts to my father. Although he was my father, she did this because, in reality, he was also my Sheikh. She did this so my knowledge would be blessed.”

I recall my teacher saying to me, when I tried to serve him, “I don’t want that type of service.” Then he paused and said, “But you need to do it. This is the way of blessing.”

Avoid Complaining, it is the Opposite of Shukur:

When we land overseas we must be very careful that our attitude is not what are these scholars going to do for us. Do not ask what your scholars can do for you, but what you can for your scholars.

Serve the ‘Ulema and treat them with respect.

Once a Sheikh from South Africa told me the following, “We had a very intelligent student with us. He was so gifted and one day he began to debate our teacher and was very rude with him. He won the debate, but our teacher turned to him and said, “If you are not careful, your knowledge will go un-blessed!” Suhaib, by Allah he was the most intelligent, gifted and bright student amongst us, however today he is working serving tea to people in the markets. All of that knowledge, all of that intelligence, and he is not asked by even one person a single question.”

Hardships:

Imam Malik said, “No one will attain this knowledge until he is afflicted with poverty that touches upon every aspect of his life.”

al-Shaf’i [may Allah have mercy upon him said], “No one will acquire this knowledge except the bankrupt.”

Once I came across some brothers in al-Azhar who told me about a brother who came to study in Egypt. He was very poor and his mother’s goal was for her son to become an Azhari. With no way to purchase the ticket for the trip, his mother sold her house in order to send him! I’ve meet a large number of brothers and sisters here who haven’t seen their families in 6-7 years. I knew some sisters who sold food in order to stay in Egypt and complete their masters in Shari’ah. It is these efforts, these struggles which plant the seeds for the future.

My Sheikh told me: “When I was young I remember seeing the brothers out at night under the street lights until late. Later on I realized that they were memorizing the Qur’an and had no electricity in their homes.”

Once one of the Shanaqita told me, “You memorize the Qur’an in your nice homes. I memorized it by the camp fire! You, Westerners go for fun to Disney Land. We used to spend our time making tafsir!”

My Sheikh told me, “I remember when I as young and the Shanaqitah would come with their kids to our city. I saw their kids playing by making ‘Irab of the language!”

I knew a student of knowledge who came to Egypt and was homeless! He used to attend classes in the day and sell watches at night. When he wanted to splurge on himself he would go, once a week, and buy Koshari. [equal to a $1.00 meal]

Western Muslims have a great opportunity since the have been blessed with wealth. However, how many times have blessings, as Ibn Taymiyyah mentioned, become trials?

The Poet wrote:

قد ينعم الله بالبلوى وإن عظمت……… ويبتلي الله بعض القوم بالنعم

Perhaps Allah will bless with trials, even if abundant………. and perhaps He will try some people with blessings!

Avoiding Hatred and Jealousy:

It moves through us like our blood. Raised on WWE,  Kimbo Slice and the Gladiator, Western Muslims are prone to make studying out into an epic adventure the likes of the Lord of the Rings. However, we are all, for some strange reason, the heroes and never the bad guys? I’ve experienced this a lot here and I’m sad to say that there are problems amongst us that I would have never imagined. Let’s move beyond these things and realize that what holds us together is stronger than what pulls us apart. This is a very serious disease of the heart and its cure, as Sidi Zaroq mentioned, in his famous principles on tasawwuf, is to do the opposite. This was also the statement of Sh. Bin ‘Uthyamin who said that the way to destroy this is to act on its opposite. Let us pray for each other, work to facilitate each others affairs and remove these evil shadowy feelings in our hearts. If not, the outcome of our knowledge will be tainted and our time spent will not be complete.

Summer Break: Know that you Don’t Know

Let us take the time, oh students of knowledge, to humble ourselves. Many of us are going back for the summer. When we get back, let’s not impose, nor direct others. We’ve spent a year or so learning, now lets spend the summer learning humility, respect and mercy. The art is not mastered by knowing, it is mastered by knowing that you don’t know. For that reason the scholars said: “I don’t know” is half of knowledge.

Often times when we go back we run into conflicts with other scholars, imams and activist in the community. Let us understand that our goals are the same, our destination is one and we need each other to arrive at, “And to your Lord is the ending.” We are not going back as the latest upgrade to ImamVirus 2009 Plus. We need to be humble. If we hear things that are wrong, let’s check ourselves and make sure we are hearing with our hearts that are clean and not with the deaf ear of arrogance and conceit. The same holds true for the masses, perhaps people will say things that, according to an Azhari, are out there, make no sense and, perhaps, are un-orthodox. Subhanallah! We ourselves have troubles, struggle to encompass the knowledge and expect people who sit 40 hours a week in front of an office desk, or burning paratas to know these things. Allah says that the Disciples of Jesus said, “Can your Lord send a table from the heavens?” This is a question that, on the surface, amounts to a major mistake in creed. None can say about Allah, “Can He do….” because He is Allah. However, as al-Qurtubi mentioned, some scholars stated that this question was acceptable because these people had just accepted Islam. If this was the case of those who lived and walked with a great Messenger of Allah, what of those who’s secretaries look like Beyonce, are struggling to raise their kid, pay the bills and keep their marriages together? Let us remember to “lower your wings to the believers” exercise humility and teach with the caress of a loving father.

Allah knows best

http://www.suhaibwebb.com